Tag Archives: Metric

Press Play: Remix

When an original becomes stale, it’s time to re-work it. Make it fresh. Hear it new. Re-discover the reason you loved it in the first place. Sometimes it’s stripped down and simplified, other times it’s amped up for a movie.

So go ahead, enjoy a collection of songs that on their own were great, and with a little TLC continue to age well.

These are the remixes and covers that we love most:

  1. Immigrant Song – Karen O, Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross (Original by Led Zeppelin)
  2. Hello Seattle (Remix) – Owl City
  3. This Woman’s Work – Greg Laswell (Original by Kate Bush)
  4. Dream On – Blessthefall (Original by Aerosmith)
  5. Baby – Reliant K (Original by Justin Beiber)
  6. Rainbow Connection – Jason Mraz (Original by Kermit the Frog)
  7. It’s Oh So Quiet – Bjork (Original by Betty Hutton)
  8. I Want You Back – Discovery (Original by Jackson 5)
  9. Gimme Sympathy (iTunes Session) – Metric
  10. Major Tom (Coming Home) – Shiny Toy Guns (Original by Peter Schilling)
  11. All My Loving – Jim Sturgess (Original by The Beatles)
  12. Nothing Better (Styrofoam Remix) – The Postal Service
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Album Review: Metric – Synthetica

“I make all that I believe, I set myself free. So take all the time you need, and let yourself be.” “Artificial Nocturne” by Metric

Emily Haines and her band don’t hold back in their new album Synthetica. Not lyrically, not musically, and certainly not artistically. Overall it is a worthy successor to their groundbreaking Fantasies released back in 2009.

Let’s talk about what it isn’t: Synthetica is neither a re-hash of Fantasies nor a collection of “lost” songs thrown together and called a new album. It’s obvious the thought that went into creating each track, as they stand on their own individually while also flowing into one another in a full-album play through.

An example of the visual inspiration & representation of Synthetica

Their first single “Youth Without Youth” took some getting used to. It didn’t have the same depth lyrically as other songs. But once you memorized the beat and song, it grew on you. The flowing ballad of “Speed the Collapse” is a dark, stormy song full of Haines’ beautiful melodies and a powerhouse chorus that will leave you breathless.

“Youth Without Youth” music video – click to watch

“Lost Kitten” is the most surprising track of them all, being something of a pop song without being that simple. It shows off Haines’ vocal range and is a nice break from the relatively dark tracks that precede it. Their title track “Synthetica” is catchy and far less dark than some of the other tracks. Rather their use of synthesized notes and a constant electric guitar evoke something of their neon-lit, electric inspiration Blade Runner.

Emily Haines on set during the “Youth Without Youth” music video shoot

Haines’ described Synthetica as being, “about forcing yourself to confront what you see in the mirror when you finally stand still long enough to catch a reflection. Synthetica is about being able to identify the original in a long line of reproductions. It’s about what is real vs what is artificial.”